Saturday, April 01, 2006

Endurance riders to boogie at Buck Meadows



Published: March 31, 2006




Endurance riders to boogie at Buck Meadows

Published: March 31, 2006

ENDURANCE RIDER Holly Foiles of Groveland and mule Sarge will act as Buck Meadows Boogie hosts along with family dog Bart.
Benjamin Hicks/Copyright 2006, The Union Democrat

By CAMERON PARKINSON

Photo: ENDURANCE RIDER Holly Foiles of Groveland and mule Sarge will act as Buck Meadows Boogie hosts along with family dog Bart.
Benjamin Hicks/Copyright 2006, The Union Democrat
It's just you, your thoughts and your mount. It's a day filled with the sights and sounds of nature. It's rattlesnakes, bobcats and hours of riding. It's an Endurance Ride.

"It's not for every horseback rider. But for those of us who like to get out and go it's a really neat thing," said Holly Foiles, a rider for the past 34 years. "It's a lot of personal satisfaction. You see things you would never see while driving around in a car."

Endurance rides can span 25, 50 and 100 miles with rides ranging from six to 24 hours.

"Most of the time you're trotting along," Foiles said. "It's not a race like you see on TV ... you have to know how fast your horse can go."

A major role in the strategy of the race involves routine veterinary checks to make sure the horses are healthy. According to Foiles, the horses must drop to a certain heart rate before being checked.

"You can pass people in the vet check. If they come in fast then it takes longer for their heart rate to come down to get checked."

Foiles and Anita Siondella are hosting a ride April 8 called the Buck Meadows Boogie with a 25- and a 50-mile races. The 50-mile riders leave at 6:30 a.m. and the 25-mile riders leave an hour later.

The 50-mile race generally takes 12 hours and the 25-mile race usually is under six hours. The races include veterinarian checks to make sure the horses are healthy, with three checks along a 50-mile route and one in a 25-mile race.

"Ultimately the riders are responsible for the horse," Foiles said. "You should be able to know your horse and know if something is rong."

Siondella rides Sam, a 16-year old horse who has more than 3,000 miles of competition experience. Sam has been on nine 100-mile rides, which usually last 24 hours.

"They have been riding together for 11 years," Foiles said. "Sam is a good horse. He's really an amazing guy."

Foiles rides 16-year old Sarge, a mule who is the last son of Frosty, Foiles' first horse.

"You try to find the most talented horse you can afford," Foiles said. "You want a horse that wants to go do this, that is happy after doing 50 miles and would be happy to go out and do another 50. Sam is that kind of horse and Sarge is pretty good at it."

Foiles said 35 riders have signed up from all over California and that a maximum of 100 can take part.

"We get people that show up in big fancy rigs and motorhomes, and then you get someone with a pickup and a tent," Foiles said. "It's not just for rich people that have money. It's for anyone who can get their horse into shape."
Click this picture to view a larger image.

ENDURANCE RIDER Holly Foiles of Groveland and mule Sarge will act as Buck Meadows Boogie hosts along with family dog Bart.
Benjamin Hicks/Copyright 2006, The Union Democrat

By CAMERON PARKINSON

It's just you, your thoughts and your mount. It's a day filled with the sights and sounds of nature. It's rattlesnakes, bobcats and hours of riding. It's an Endurance Ride.

"It's not for every horseback rider. But for those of us who like to get out and go it's a really neat thing," said Holly Foiles, a rider for the past 34 years. "It's a lot of personal satisfaction. You see things you would never see while driving around in a car."

Endurance rides can span 25, 50 and 100 miles with rides ranging from six to 24 hours.

"Most of the time you're trotting along," Foiles said. "It's not a race like you see on TV ... you have to know how fast your horse can go."

A major role in the strategy of the race involves routine veterinary checks to make sure the horses are healthy. According to Foiles, the horses must drop to a certain heart rate before being checked.

"You can pass people in the vet check. If they come in fast then it takes longer for their heart rate to come down to get checked."

Foiles and Anita Siondella are hosting a ride April 8 called the Buck Meadows Boogie with a 25- and a 50-mile races. The 50-mile riders leave at 6:30 a.m. and the 25-mile riders leave an hour later.

The 50-mile race generally takes 12 hours and the 25-mile race usually is under six hours. The races include veterinarian checks to make sure the horses are healthy, with three checks along a 50-mile route and one in a 25-mile race.

"Ultimately the riders are responsible for the horse," Foiles said. "You should be able to know your horse and know if something is rong."

Siondella rides Sam, a 16-year old horse who has more than 3,000 miles of competition experience. Sam has been on nine 100-mile rides, which usually last 24 hours.

"They have been riding together for 11 years," Foiles said. "Sam is a good horse. He's really an amazing guy."

Foiles rides 16-year old Sarge, a mule who is the last son of Frosty, Foiles' first horse.

"You try to find the most talented horse you can afford," Foiles said. "You want a horse that wants to go do this, that is happy after doing 50 miles and would be happy to go out and do another 50. Sam is that kind of horse and Sarge is pretty good at it."

Foiles said 35 riders have signed up from all over California and that a maximum of 100 can take part.

"We get people that show up in big fancy rigs and motorhomes, and then you get someone with a pickup and a tent," Foiles said. "It's not just for rich people that have money. It's for anyone who can get their horse into shape."

No comments:

Scotland’s Katy riding high but needs help on road to Wales

Deesidepiper.co.uk - Full Article Thursday 19 September 2019 Young Katy Parvin of Peterculter has been selected to ride for Scotland fo...